A pedant that hangs out in the dark corner-cases of the web.

Wednesday, December 19, 2007

Why OPML?

So, when exporting or importing a list of feeds, why are we using OPML, when any feed reader already has an Atom and/or RSS parser? It seems like those formats would work as well for a list of links.

Wednesday, December 05, 2007

configSource: "It must refer to a file in the same directory or in a subdirectory as the configuration file."

Since the configSource attribute, to include .NET config file sections from external files, only allows relative paths and no parent paths, it severely limits the ability to centralize configuration settings for multiple config files.

Unless you use NTFS hard links or junction points, of course.

For example, if you have a ConnectionStrings.config file that you want to reference from your .NET 2.0 machine.config and your .NET 3.5 machine.config, you can create a directory within the .NET 2.0 CONFIG directory called ConnectionStrings, then create a hard link (for files, using fsutil hardlink) or junction point (for an entiry directory, using junction) with the same name within the .NET 3.5 CONFIG directory. When you put the ConnectionStrings.config in either directory, it will exist in both, so you can point to ConnectionStrings\ConnectionStrings.config with a configSource attribute in both machine.config files, and still only have a single file to maintain.